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October 01, 2005

Comments

John "Z-Bo" Zabroski

Chris, I applaud you for pointing out the very reason why I refuse to adopt the phrase "Web 2.0": the definition of what Web 2.0 is so far only defined by example, and not by an actual definition. So, for now, I keep telling software engineers and business people to describe by example what they think will attract customers.

One thing, though. "The Perpetual Beta" is not something new, in the slightest. Blizzard Entertainment has been doing this for years with their online games and servers, Linux has pretty much always been known (at least by the early adopters) as the perpetual beta operating system kernel, and Frederick P Brooks pretty much advocates the same software engineering methodology about fourty years ago. Really, anything FOSS **with the right licensing agreement** is a perpetual beta. I'm not sure if you heard, but GPL3.0 is supposedly going to close a loophole where web applications that use GPL code have to disclose how they use that code. This is a mindblowing concept in terms of the Long Tail and may give a new peculiarity to the Long Tail not discussed before (out of what I have read).

So the premise "When devices and programs are connected to the internet, applications are no longer software artifacts, they are ongoing services" is blatantly false. Causality is very important when explaining things.

chris anderson

John,

Good points. You may be interested to see that since my post Tim has actually taken a stab at a short definition here. I still think it's pretty fuzzy, but as I say, that's probably unavoidable.

John "Z-Bo" Zabroski

Chris, excellent of you to point that out to me, thanks.

I think Tim would be a lot better served if he took the phrase "Web 2.0" and instead of making it a definition, making it much, much more of a framework/methodology like CASE. That's difficult to do, though, since "Web 2.0" is a meme and has become its own life force of sorts. Right now, most of what Tim is doing is building a paradigm that explains the many ways you can describe "Web 2.0".

I agree the fuzzy is probably unavoidable, which is why I conclude businesses need to be careful when spreading the "Web 2.0" as a source of *specification* within its corporate culture. Everyone in the organization needs to think the same thing about "Web 2.0" when it's spoken or there will be communication issues that result in faults in the product. Perpetual beta or not, fixing the faults created by miscommunication costs money.

Francis Hamit

The push for low barriers on the the reuse of intellectual property is a great idea from the consumer point of view, but very hostile to creators. It becomes harder and harder to simply make a living from your art. This is not a new problem, but goes back to when books started being a mass production product. The first copyright law, The Statute of Anne, which was enacted in 1710, was very specific on this point.

What is needed is a system similar to the UK's "Public Lending Right" where small payments are aggregated and sent to writers every year for the access to their creations. The technology to apply this principle to the Internet would be no more complex than the credit card payemnt systems already in place and it would play very well into the Long Tail model at all levels.

The Art Institute of Chicago has a sign in the lobby. "You may pay what you like to enter, but your must pay something". It's free on Thursdays. Otherwise those wishing access have to contribute. Donations motivated by conscience are a proven model for compensating cultural institutions, so why not use this method to pay the artists themselves? Or alternativly, charge for access on a per page basis that is negigible for every instance but totals to adequate compensation over the long term. Fractions of a cent become thousands of dollars. Without caps or limitations, such a system would also accomodate best sellers.

бесплатно

Good points. You may be interested to see that since my post

Rickle

This Book is no doubt great. However, it seems like just comply with the online business. If we have to think about the physical business, we should level down the effect of Long Tail

Rickle

This Book is no doubt great. However, it seems like just comply with the online business. If we have to think about the physical business, we should level down the effect of Long Tail

lonestar

time zone test.

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Tidbits

The Long Tail by Chris Anderson

Notes and sources for the book

FREE was available in all digital forms--ebook, web book, and audiobook--for free shortly after the hardcover was published on July 7th. The ebook and web book were free for a limited time and limited to certain geographic regions as determined by each national publisher; the unabridged MP3 audiobook (get zip file here) will remain free forever, available in all regions.

Order the hardcover now!